Traditional Brewers of real ales in cask
and bottle, using local ingredients where available.
Since 2011
Kinneil Brew Hoose,
84 Corbiehall,
Bo'ness
EH51 0AS
07789 204 008
info@kinneilbrew.co.uk
2 litre
Growler
5 litre
Mini Keg
19 litre
Cornie
Kinneil Brew Hoose has been brewing great beers behind the Corbie Inn since November 2011. It's a true microbrewery, producing only 368 litres per brew. (about 9 casks or 80 gallons).We started with a single beer, Pennvael Amber.
Pennvael is still with us, but it has been joined by another 5 regular beers. We've also produced countless seasonal and special event ales, wedding ales, birthday ales etc..
All our beers are available on draught and bottle conditioned.
Bottles are all 500mls and are available individually as well as in our popular 3- and 6- bottle presentation packs.

The 5 litre microkegs have a built in re sealable tap, and are great if you need about 9 pints of draught beer for a special occasion.
The 2 litre brown glass growler comes direct from the brewery. If you buy the growler with 2 litres of beer, you can bring it back and we'll re-fill it. It's the equivalent of 4 bottles, so you could share it with a friend, or put the lid back and keep some for the next day. Of course you could drink it all at once if you wanted!

For parties, weddings etc. we can supply 19 litre “Cornie” kegs with free use of a hand pull. So you can have pub style draught ale at your event. Speak to us nicely and we'll even make your own font clip, or badge.
Our beer is cask conditioned and fined.We are now supplying our bottled beer unfined, which helps preserve the flavours of the beer. It may also make it suitable for a vegetarian diet.
Amber coloured ale with a distinctive hoppy aftertaste from the use of Target hops.
Pennvael Amber 4.0%.
Pennvael is the ancient Pictish or Welsh version of “Kinneil”, The village adjacent to Kinneil House (to the west of our brewery), one of the seats of the Dukes of Hamilton. Seems that sometime in the seventeenth century, the then duke decided a park would be preferable to a village so close to his house. He evicted the villagers and demolished the village. Until that time, the villagers were brewers and maltsters, which is why we used the name “Kinneil”.
A very dark ruby red porter style ale. Hints of chocolate, liquorice, molasses.
Caer Edin Dark Ale. 4.2%.
Caer Edin, Like “Pennvael” is from the ancient Pictish or Welsh language. The modern day version is found in Carriden, at the east end of modern Bo'ness. Several native Welsh speakers have given us the meaning as “fort on the hill”, and call Edinburgh “Caer Edin.” Present day Carriden certainly has the hill. Wonder what happened to the fort?
Kincardine Sunset 4.1%
Named for sunsets often visible over the River Forth. Slightly citrus, hoppy ale.
The story behind the name “Kincardine Sunset” is probably fairly obvious to anyone who has lived in Bo'ness. Sunsets over towards Kincardine have always been pretty spectacular, and now commemorated in the beer's name. Sometimes the finished beer suggests the name. In this case the colour suggested sunsets, and the picture was duly taken from outside the brewer's house!
Our Beers
Katie Wearie's and Corbieha' Pale Ales 3.8%.
Actually the same beer renamed due to local sensitivities – A pale, refreshing beer using German Perle hops for a great lasting hop taste.
Katie was a 19th Century cattle drover who rested under a tree in Linlithgow. To this day, the tree is known as "Katie Wearie's tree", and a small memorial has been erected to her memory.
When the beer went on sale at the Corbie Inn, it was renamed “Corbieha' Pale Ale ” Same beer, different town!
“Corbie” was the old Scots name for the crow. Hence Corbieha' ( or Corbiehall to use its full name) and, of course the Corbie Inn.
Wayfinder Pale Ale 3.8%
The same malt profile as Katie Wearie's but using Czech Saaz hops to create an entirely different but equally refreshing beer. Slight sweet citrus hints - pink grapefruit?
With the help of Scottish Natural Heritage, we named this beer for the Wayfinder posts on the John Muir Way, which passes our back door. Due to trade-mark laws, we can't use the words “John Muir” in any of our displays or advertising. But most people now know the bearded man!
Wonderfu' Jake 3.6%
Our up to date interpretation of an old Scottish 60/- Ale. It's a smooth drinking dark ale, retaining plenty of flavour and body belying its lower gravity.
Wonderfu' Jake... John Sneddon, the man who “fell up the pit” was working at the pit heid when he fell down the shaft. Luckily, the cage was coming up as he began his unplanned descent. He landed on top of the cage and lived to tell the tale. In the great Bo'ness nickname tradition, John became known ever after as “Wonderfu' Jake, the man who fell up the pit.” 60/- is a style of beer with which Mr Sneddon may well have been familiar, so it's fitting this beer commemorates the lucky break that Wonderfu' Jake had!.
Pale Malt
Crystal Malt
Wheat Malt
Fuggles,
Wye Target
Czech Saaz
Pale Malt
Crystal Malt
Wheat Malt
Black Malt
Oats
Roast Barley
Fuggles,
Wye Target
Czech Saaz
Pale Malt
Crystal Malt
Wheat Malt
Fuggles,
Styrian Goldings
Pale Malt
Crystal Malt
Carapils
Fuggles,
Perle
Pale Malt
Crystal Malt
Carapils
Fuggles,
Czech Saaz
Perle
Pale Malt
Crystal Malt
Carapils
Black Malt
Roast Barley
Fuggles,
East Kent Goldings
 It's right behind the Corbie Inn,with its own entrance at the back, although if you want to see inside, you should go into the Corbie where there are viewing windows . The building was the cellar for the original pub, but it was completely renovated before the brewery was installed.
 
And inside...
There's a complete microbrewery which brews beer from malted barley. We're an all grain brewer, which means we don't use malt extract to make our beer. Most of the equipment was bought from Mossbrew brewing systems, and installed by ourselves, with additions and modifications being incorporated, for example the conditioning cellar and the cask rinser. Of course, over the years we have been open, many more modifications have been done. It's just the nature of micro brewing!
The building
The Brewery
Kinneil House and village - the brewing tradition

Kinneil Village was sited to the west of Kinneil House, once a seat of the Dukes of Hamilton. As its street, or causeway, it used the base of the Roman rampart.
In the seventeenth century, the main occupation of the villagers was malting and brewing. Certainly, at that time, brewing wasn't done on a large commercial scale, and the Kinneil villagers would have brewed in a small dwelling, or "hoose", When Bo'ness became a village, the early inhabitants were bound by their title deeds to have their grain malted at the Brewlands of Kinneil.

In the year 720 AD, Bede refers to Pennel-tun as being the end of the Roman Wall. Or Peanfahel ("end of the wall") according to the Picts. The name seems to have been modernised at various periods in history, becoming Pennvael, Kinel, Cenail, and finally Kinneil.

The Romans themselves may well have brought brewing to Scotland. There's no evidence they brewed at the 18th military station (Kinneil), but it's fun to think of the centurions quaffing the odd pint or two of an evening when they weren't on duty guarding the wall! Romans in the gloaming?

The name of Kinneil Brew Hoose marks the presence of the Romans on the Antonine wall, as well as reviving the tradition of the ancient Kinneil Brewers. Maybe one day, we'll find their recipe, and be able to re-create one of their brews - Until then we'll concentrate on using the finest ingredients wherever possible, and delivering to the local area. Just as they did!
Bo'ness and Brewing
Kinneil village was an ancient site of brewing, up until the 17th Century, but brewing was carried on in the town, probably until the early 19th C. Records show that there were several breweries in the 17th C. The brewers protested at the imposition of 2 pennies tax on every pint sold in the town. The tax was intended to keep the harbour in repair. They petitioned for a new town well because the colliers were using the water and polluting the well..
 According to Scottish Brewing Archives, Charles Addison & Sons were merchants in Bo’ness who also operated a brewery. The business was valued as one of the largest concerns in Scotland during the period 1793-1815. Also listed is Kinglass Brewery, probably located somewhere in the area where Lidl's shop and McLucas yard area, possibly where it says "granary" on the old map (left).
By-products of malting barley used for brewing beer have been identified as viable human food sources. These "spent grains" are rich in insoluble fiber, but Kinneil Brew Hoose spent grains aren't fed directly to humans. Instead all the grains are put back in the delivery sacks and taken by a local farmer and fed to his cattle. So not only is the grain recycled, the sacks are too. Incidentally, the farmer tells me he re-uses the sacks again to transport grain on the farm!

The hop residue is composted and recycled as compost on private gardens.
Feeding the cows
Local suppliers are used wherever possible. Most of our ingredients have to come from England, so we use a single supplier for the majority of our purchasing. This allows the brewery to have typically one monthly delivery. Obviously better for the environment, and cost saving at the same time!

 Some items are bought in collaboration with other microbrewers, saving cost and allowing bulk deliveries.

Pale malt is the largest bulk item used in the brewery, and we collect it from East Lothian, direct from Mungoswells farm, once a month. We combine this with beer deliveries in the same area to save fuel.

Pictures on the left show the malt coming from the crusher, and being loaded into 25 Kg bags just prior to being loaded onto the brewery van for the journey back to Kinneil Brew Hoose. You can't get your malt much fresher than that!
Mungoswells is the only farm we know that actually malts and crushes the malt right on the farm.
Keeping it Local.....
Environmental
Contact Details
Kinneil Brew Hoose,
At Corbie Inn
84 Corbiehall
Bo'ness
West Lothian
EH51 0AS
07789 204 008
info@kinneilbrew.co.uk
Transport
If you want to visit the brewery, or the Corbie Inn, the map shows where we are. You can get a bus to Bo'ness. We're just a short walk from Bo'ness Bus Station. Linlithgow Train Station is about 3 miles.
If you are walking the John Muir Way, you'll pass right by our back door, on the other side of the Bo'ness and Kinneil Railway.
You can visit the brewery from within the Corbie Inn.
Connect to our Facebook to get up to date (well nearly!) news about what we are up to.
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Links
All our links are in this column, Click the images to go to our facebook page, to email us or to visit another site.
Email us about anything to do with our beer or the web page.
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The Corbie, next door to the brewery. Neighbours, landlords, and good friends. 2015 Forth Valley CAMRA Pub of the
pub of the year too!
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The Corbie's facebook page. Keep up to date with what's going on, and which beers are being served. Usually including one of ours!
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SRPS website where you can find out all about the railway museum, tours, trips etc.
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Bo'ness and Kinneil Railway. The line runs just behind the brewery back door.
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Scottish Brewing Archive. Information about brewers and brewing, past and present.
Renovations
 Of course, the brewery wasn't always as you see it in the wee pictures to the left. Like the Corbie Inn next door, major rebuilding had to be done before we could even think about brewing....
Under the floor we found evidence of a huge void, filled with massive boulders. We thought it would be great if it was a beer cellar. Just the thing we need! Maybe there was a tunnel built by Kinneil miners to come up for a pint on the backshift? Anyway, we just left it and concreted it over, the stones just too big to move. A few weeks ago we were visited by a gentleman who once worked in the pub in its previous existence. He told us the original pub cellar was definitely under our floor. Now wondering if we could have excavated it after all?
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The Friends of Kinneil charity has been set up to help promote and develop Kinneil Estate and Foreshore in Bo’ness.
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